sYNGEO – The geography of synchrony in dendritic networks: understanding the causes, dynamics, and consequences across multiple scales

1st meeting: 14.-18.01.2019
PIs: Julian D Olden, Lise Comte

Human modification of Earth’s land and water has reshuffled the distribution of plants and animals across the world, with important consequences for the provisioning and stability of ecosystem services. In light of this global environmental crisis, ecologists have repeatedly called for a greater understanding of the mechanisms responsible for shaping biodiversity dynamics across complex landscapes. Riverine ecosystems are unique from other spatially structured habitats because population and meta-community dynamics are largely constrained by organism movements along dendritic networks whose structure varies both in space and time. Fresh waters thus represent both a distinct challenge and a novel opportunity to reveal the causes, dynamics, and consequences of synchrony in population fluctuations and aggregate community properties. sYNGEO will leverage the power of long-term fish time-series from across the world, extensive fish dispersal and trait databases, and innovative geospatial methods to address the fundamental question of how population (intraspecific synchrony) and community (interspecific synchrony) dynamics are structured in space and time along river networks. We will investigate whether these driving forces scale up to shape ecosystem stability from local to regional scales, and test how the geography of synchrony has changed, and with what consequences, in response to environmental alterations and species invasions. sYNGEO aims to both synthesize and extend the conceptual and analytical tools in ecological synchrony research, thus advancing predictive science that anticipates how, where, and why changes in freshwater biodiversity dynamics and ecosystem stability may occur in response to current and future global changes.

Participants:
Ulrich Brose (iDiv); Lise Comte (University of Washington); Tibor Erös (MTA Centre for Ecological Research); Ana Filipa Filipe (CIBIO); Marie-Josee Fortin (University of Toronto); Xingli Giam (The University of Tennessee); Katherine Irving (Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries); Claire Jacquet (University of Zurich); Stefano Larsen (University of Trento); Julian Olden (University of Washington); Albert Ruhi (University of California, Berkeley); Sapna Sharma (York University); Pablo Tedesco (UMR Evolution & Diversité Biologique, CNRS)

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2nd meeting: 29.07.-1.8.2019

Participants:
Ulrich Brose (iDiv); Lise Comte (University of Washington); Tibor Erös (MTA Centre for Ecological Research); Ana Filipa Filipe (CIBIO); Marie-Josee Fortin (University of Toronto); Xingli Giam (The University of Tennessee); Katherine Irving (Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries); Claire Jacquet (University of Zurich); Stefano Larsen (University of Trento); Julian Olden (University of Washington); Albert Ruhi (University of California, Berkeley); Remo Ryser (idiv), Sapna Sharma (York University); Pablo Tedesco (UMR Evolution & Diversité Biologique, CNRS)

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Publications:

Erős T., Comte L. et al. (2020) Effects of nonnative species on the stability of riverine fish communities. Ecography. See here

Comte, L, Carvajal‐Quintero, J, Tedesco, PA, et al. (2020) RivFishTIME: A global database of fish time‐series to study global change ecology in riverine systems. Global Ecol Biogeogr. 0: 1–13. See here

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