Date
25–26 April 2022

Venue
online

Contact
Doreen Brückner
+49 341 9733130
idiv-conference@idiv.de


Dear iDiv scientists,

We are pleased to invite you to the seventh iDiv conference, the most important annual iDiv event that brings together experienced and young iDiv scientists. The conference provides an interactive forum for scientific exchange as well as for establishing new contacts and collaborations within the iDiv consortium.
The goal of this years conference is to bring the iDiv community back together in an inspiring meeting, and to promote scientific exchange through formal and informal interactions across multiple facets of biodiversity research.
To achieve this, together with multiple iDiv members we have established a scientific programme rich in a diverse set of activities, from talk sessions to interactive workshops, covering all of iDiv's research areas and specialized topics.
Due to the uncertainty regarding the pandemic and to assure equality among all participants it has been decided to hold the 2022 iDiv conference as a fully remote event.

We hope to welcome you at the end of April at the conference!

Yours, on behalf of the iDiv Conference Organising Committee,

Martina Herrmann, Omer Nevo and Marten Winter
Conference Chairs

This year's Conference Organising Committee: Cynthia Chang, Saneesh Cherapurath Soman, Andrea Cortegoso Galman, Van Cong Doan, Martina Herrmann, Omer Nevo, Marten Winter, Doreen Brückner, Kati Kietzmann, Ronja Wodner




Programme


Book of Abstracts


Poster Booklet


Preliminary Program

25 April

Session 1

Session 2

Session 3

Session 4

09:00

Welcome and Introduction

09:15

Keynote talk by Claire Fortunel (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Montpellier)

10:00

Coffee Break

10:15

Thematic Session

The Evolution of Biotic Interactions

Thematic Session

The iDiv-Barcoding Initiative (iBarc)

Thematic Session

Frontiers in Methods in Biodiversity Research

 

11:45

Active Break and Lunch Break

12:45

Thematic Session

Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Scenarios in the Context of Climate and Land-use Change

Open Session

Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning

Open Session

Biodiversity Change

 

14:15

Break

14:30

Poster Sessions

with presenters in the online booths

15:30

Break

15:45

Interactive Session

RGame

Interactive Session

The iDiv-Barcoding Initiative - part II - discussion (iBarc)

Interactive Session

Priority Biodiversity Change Drivers for iDiv - World Café -

Interactive Session

Interactive lecture for diversity and inclusion

17:15

Networking tables for presenters

19:00

Social Event / Networking

The iDiv Science Slam  - communicate your research in a creative way

at the iDiv building and online

 

26 April

Session 1

Session 2

Session 3

09:15

Keynote talk by Prof. Zeynaur Khan ( ICIPE - International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology Nairobi, Kenia)

10:00

Coffee Break

10:15

Open Session

Complexity

Open Session

Molecular Biodiversity and Adaptation

Thematic Session

Complex Mechanisms in a Complex World

11:45

Active Break and Lunch Break

12:45

Thematic Session

Drivers of Global Biodiversity Change

 

Open Session

Biodiversity & Society

Thematic Session

Patterns & Drivers in the Anthropocene

14:15

Break

14:30

Poster Sessions

with presenters in the online booths

15:30

Plenary / Award Ceremony

16:00

Interactive Session

Child & Nature

Interactive Session

Crash Course High-level policy - How to navigate the world of "distinguished delegates

Interactive Session

The Future of Biodiversity Monitoring in Europe

17:30

Networking tables for presenters

Keynote Lectures

Claire Fortunel

University of Montpellier, France

Date

25 April

09:15 AM

 

­­­

Location

online

Functional trait differences and the mechanisms structuring diverse communities

Abstract:

A long-term research goal for ecologists is to understand the mechanisms shaping local communities and the consequences for ecosystem-level processes. It also represents a major challenge as global change rapidly alters abiotic gradients and biotic interactions. In this context, there are three major questions that motivate my research: (1) what mechanisms shape communities in species-rich systems? (2) do these mechanisms act similarly across environments and regions? (3) how will diverse communities respond to global change? In order to address these mechanistic questions in highly diverse tropical forests, where we don’t know much about the biology of the majority of species, I combine approaches from community ecology, functional ecology and phylogenetics. Functional traits reflect key physiological features and life history tradeoffs, while phylogenetic relationships can provide an additional estimate of overall species similarity in the absence of other information. Combining trait and phylogenetic information allows for a powerful test of the mechanistic role of species differences in shaping local communities. In this talk, I will present recent work evaluating the mechanisms shaping tropical forests and testing if these mechanisms act similarly across environments and regions. Together these studies illustrate the need to combine different approaches for improving our understanding of the mechanisms shaping communities and ecosystems. Experimental work is instrumental in providing detailed tests of how different mechanisms of community assembly shape species distribution and dynamics, but it remains difficult to conduct such detailed studies for many species at broad spatial scales. If traits can provide good proxies for species response to different mechanisms, we can leverage that information in models and simulations to better predict large scale responses of communities. To gain a stronger predictive ability of the response of these diverse communities to global change across scales, it will be critical to combine experimental and quantitative approaches.


Prof Zeyaur Khan

International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology, Kenya

Date

26 April

09:15 AM

 

­­­

Location
online

Exploiting plant and insect biodiversity for developing sustainable crop protection strategies for Africa and beyond

Abstract:

The ‘push-pull’ system (www.push-pull.net), developed by exploiting plant and insect biodiversity  effectively controls serious biotic  constraints to cereal-livestock  production in Africa, stemborers, fall armyworm,  and striga weed, while improving soil health. It allows income diversification with sustainable livelihood components such as livestock farming. The companion cropping system makes smallholder farms more resilient often with a tripling of yields and has now been made more climate smart. It involves attracting stemborers with trap plants (pull) whilst stemborers and fall armyworm away from the main crop using a repellent intercrop (push). Chemicals released by intercrop roots induce abortive germination of the noxious parasitic striga weed. The companion plants provide high value animal fodder year-round, facilitating milk production. Furthermore, soil fertility is improved due to improved nitrogen fixation, carbon sequestration and phosphorus availability, reduced soil erosion and degradation. The technology improves gender equity and is appropriate for smallholders, and economical as it is based on locally available plants, not expensive external inputs. It fits well with traditional mixed cropping systems in Africa. The push-pull system has been adapted to drier and hotter conditions linked to climate change by identification and incorporation of drought tolerant companion crops. This climate-smart push-pull directly responds to rising uncertainties in Africa’s rain-fed agriculture due to the continent’s vulnerability to climate change. The new companion crops, Desmodium intortum and Brachiaria Mulato II hybrid, can withstand extended periods of drought stress with no water. To date push-pull has been adopted by over 250,000 smallholder farmers in 18 sub-Saharan African countries whose maize yields have increased from about 1 t/ha to 3.5 t/ha. Low-input technologies that address several production constraints and deliver multiple benefits are more relevant for African smallholder farmers but also proves useful lessons for agricultural systems in the developed world.

 

 

Code of Conduct

iDiv is committed to creating a work environment that is safe, professional and of mutual trust where diversity and inclusion are valued, and where everyone is entitled to be treated with courtesy and respect. If you feel you have experienced any harassment or discrimination or would like to report any concerns, the Conference Chairs are the persons you should speak to first. You can also send a confidential email to idiv-conference@idiv.de to report a concern.

When should you speak up?

  1. Facing unacceptable abusive, bullying or intimidating behavior, e.g discrimination against age, hierarchical level, sex, disability, sexual orientation, race, colour, ethnic origin, religion or political belief.
  2. Facing health & safety risks: Persons engaging in behavior that might be dangerous to themselves or others. This includes the use of drugs or abuse of alcohol.

How to deal with unacceptable behavior?
Participants asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately. In general, any measures depend on the severity of a certain behavior. Urgent matters will immediately be discussed and an appropriate action recommended or taken. Especially behaviors that might be dangerous to others are not tolerated and the person will be banned from the venue.

Session Descriptions

Thematic sessions

The evolution of biotic interactions and ecosystem functioning
This session would include studies exploring the ecological mechanisms underlying biotic interactions like i) plant-plant interaction, ii) plant-soil interactions, iii) plant-animal interactions, including herbivores and the third trophic level (i.e. predators and parasitoids of herbivores). In addition, the topics covered in the session may include the role of functional and phylogenetic diversity shaping ecosystems, the role of abiotic factors shaping the biotic interactions and also how the creation of novel interactions, derived from global change, alter the ecosystems. Andrea Cortegoso Galmán

Biodiversity and ecosystem services scenarios in the context of climate and land-use change
This session will focus on presenting and discussing work on scenario and projections-based research covering multiple scales (from local/national to global) of multiple biodiversity (e.g., single species, groups of species, alpha diversity, beta diversity, etc.) and ecosystem services (e.g., single services, tradeoffs, multifunctionality, etc.) variables. We will try to have a balance between talks and discussion and will leave room for proposing new collaborative work on the topic. Carlos Guerra (carlos.guerra@idiv.de)

Platforms for biodiversity science (poster session)
The iDiv community will learn more about opportunities to collaborate in the iDiv platforms. Jes Hines (jessica.hines@idiv.de)

Drivers of Global Biodiversity Change
During iDiv’s previous funding phase, iDiv researchers built or advanced several global biodiversity databases that enabled important new insights into different facets of global biodiversity change, from individuals and populations to (meta)communities and ecosystems. In parallel, we witnessed the emergence of many new datasets on putative drivers of biodiversity change, while modeling tools for the prediction and causal attribution of these changes matured substantially. This session aims to provide an overview of recent advances in iDiv research tackling drivers of biodiversity changes from a theoretical, data, and methodological perspective. Talks may cover, 

  • Empirical assessments of drivers of biodiversity change
  • Advances in developing hypotheses or predictive theories related to biodiversity-change drivers
  • Advances in methods to attribute biodiversity changes to specific environmental/anthropogenic causes
  • New data capturing spatiotemporal dynamics in important biodiversity-change drivers
  • Assessment and/or treatment of uncertainties in data or models of biodiversity change-drivers

Carsten Meyer (carsten.meyer@idiv.de)

Frontiers in methods in biodiversity research
In recent years biodiversity research has become more and more complex, relying on methods from citizen science to remote sensing to high-end computational models, as well as the transition from established methods like genetics or chemistry to the “omics”. The session will feature the latest work from iDiv researchers, presenting new methods and their applications in biodiversity research.

Complex mechanisms in a complex world
Biodiversity develops and is maintained via complex interactions of many different processes and factors. This very diverse session is a perfect example of iDiv’s integration idea. It provides insights across a broad set of systems and taxa, how biodiversity interacts with each other and how outcomes of those interactions can look like. The session also offers insights into how humans perceive and communicate this complexity.

Patterns & drivers in the anthropocene
The acceleration of human activity since the industrial revolution, and particularly in the 20th and 21 centuries, has challenged almost every natural habitat across the globe. Ecosystem globally face multiple and rapid challenges from changing climate, increased land use, pollution, human-mediated invasive species, and more. Speakers in this session will examine the effects of rapid change on multiple levels of different model systems.

General open session surrounding iDiv core research topics

Complexity
Aims at understanding how the complex structure of natural ecosystems begets their high biodiversity.

Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning
Explores the context dependency of biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) relationships across spatial and temporal scales

Biodiversity Change
This research area aims at a rigorous understanding of how biodiversity is changing by combining synthesis, theory and detection. iDiv researchers study how to monitor biodiversity, assess changes in multiple dimensions of biodiversity across time and space, and uncover the mechanistic properties that underpin those changes.

Molecular Biodiversity and Adaptation
Aims to identify molecular and chemical mechanisms underlying organismal diversity, interaction networks and (co-)evolutionary processes that lead to local adaptation, population differentiation and speciation.

Biodiversity & Society
Aim at a systemic understanding of how society affects and benefits from biodiversity and to develop science to support target setting for policy and societal change toward a better future

 

Interactive sessions and activities

Interactive lecture for diversity and inclusion
1) lecture about D&I, including clarification of language and "ABC of anti-discrimination" with (social) identity, privilege, power, discrimination and its different levels (internalized, interpersonal, institutional, ideological), internal bias, intersectionality

2) exercises for e.g. personal reflection about identity, privilege, interdependencies, power, communication

3) benefits of D&I, relating it to iDiv/academia, brainstorming about needs, visions, roadmapping, collection of problems, etc.

Judith Rakowski (judith.rakowski@ufz.de)

The iDiv-Barcoding Initiative (iBarc)
DNA Barcoding is a molecular tool for applications in biodiversity assessment using a DNA-sequence of one or several marker-genes, so-called barcodes. We want to bring together different research groups at iDiv to present and discuss their research projects, and applications in different fields (e.g. taxonomic and functional diversity, microbial communities, animal-plant interactions, quantitative approaches such as assessment of populations sizes, biomass). We intend to develop plans for further activities and to establish a competence-grid. Martin Schlegel (schlegel@uni-leipzig.de)

R Game
The R statistical software is ever-expanding. But how do you keep up with all the latest and greatest? Is there a package that has been a ‘game-changer’ for you? Think it might be helpful to others? In this workshop, we invite people across all research areas to share their latest R package finds. Each contributor will present a 3-5 min talk that showcases their favorite package, with a particular focus on the latest and greatest. The goal for a presenter is to really show off why that particular R package is cool and convince the audience that they need to download that package for themselves. Hopefully, at the end of the workshop we’ll all walk away with a few new tools in our belt for our next data analysis project.

We leave it open on types of packages — but there is a preference for non-mainstream packages (e.g., can probably avoid tidyverse packages given their overwhelming popularity). . We ask people to send us proposals beforehand and we will organize the presentations into thematic sessions (e.g., data retrieving, data processing, data visualization, analyses, spatial).

Each session will comprise several 3-5 min talks depending on participation, with a short Q&A at the end. In total, we expect the talks,Q&As, and any potential discussions, to take about 1.5 h. To add a little spice, we will finish with a voting session to award The Winner. Diana Bowler (diana.bowler@idiv.de); Corey Callagham (corey.callaghan@idiv.de)

Priority Biodiversity Change Drivers for iDiv - World Café - Integrating perspectives on change drivers of question-oriented data users and data-oriented producers
This World Café session aims to develop a common understanding of major interests, opportunities, and remaining challenges for integrative research of biodiversity change drivers at iDiv. To this end, it will identify critical (or underexplored) linkages between biodiversity change drivers and outcomes, and explore how we can leverage iDiv’s expertise on both needs (question-driven perspective) and potentials (data-oriented perspective) during the new funding phase.
The World Café will be organized around 3 main questions, each of which will be addressed in four parallel break-out groups (each facilitated by a session co-chair), interchanging with three short plenary sessions.

Q1) What are the presumed/expected most critical (or most exciting/underexplored) linkages between different biodiversity-change drivers and outcomes (e.g., potentially including interactions between drivers, effects on different facets of BD change, etc.)?Each group will synthesize and present their questions in the first plenary, and we will vote on the top 2 or 3 questions to take into the second round (meanwhile, some of the session chairs will start collating data options for these variables).

Q2) For the prioritized driver-outcome relationships, what are the specific needs in terms of spatial, temporal, and thematic scope and detail (e.g. extent and grain), and how would the ideal driver variable(s) be defined? What type of applications would breakout groups prioritize over the near-term (e.g. big-picture, pattern-descriptive assessment vs. causal hypothesis tests vs. continuous monitoring of driver-response relationships vs. scenario modelling vs. concrete support for local conservation interventions, etc.)?.

The second plenary will synthesize these requirements and summarize available options of existing driver data.The third break-out session will turn perspectives from needs to opportunities, by asking

Q3) How well do the attributes of existing (or near-term conceivable) driver products approximate the prioritized ideal driver variable? What implications do any deviations between ideal and feasible driver definitions/scales of representation have for our biodiversity outcome variables/processes of interest?.

During the second plenary, break-out groups will briefly report on their assessments and session chairs will present a brief overview of available (and/or near-term conceivable) driver data options. The final plenary will be used to further discuss and synthesize the emerging perspectives. Depending on how the discussion goes, possible outcomes might range from a wishlist of driver variables that may inspire future product-development work at iDiv, to ad-hoc match-making between outcome- and driver-oriented iDiv experts, to continued discussions in smaller teams or join work towards a perspectives paper. Hosted by the Macroecology and Society Group (carsten.meyer@idiv.de)

Child and Nature: exploring children's attitudes towards their natural environments
Our session combines aspects from the areas Biodiversity & Society and Biodiversity & Complexity (species interactions). We will cover the topics: development of children's attitudes towards nature; cultural variability of human-animal-relationships, and the development of human-centered morality. Katja Liebal (katja.liebal@uni-leipzig.de)

Crash course high-level policy - How to navigate the world of "distinguished delegates"
In this interactive session we will give a crash course to high-level policy such as CBD meetings, IPBES plenaries or policy work on the EU level.
Where do you find the important information, how do the processes work and how can you as a scientist get engaged. The session will consist of short input talks and a longer, interactive part. Andrea Perino (andrea.perino@idiv.de)

Europa Biodiversity Observation Network: integrating data streams to support policy
Just over one year into the project, EuropaBON has made substantial progress on achieving some of its targets aimed at designing an EU-wide framework for monitoring biodiversity and ecosystem services. In this session, we want to report on EuropaBON’s main achievements in the first year of its existence and the work that still lies ahead. We will also report on a related project in the Tropical Andes (TAO) and provide a hands-on session on the GEO BON EBV Data Portal. Jessi Junker (jessica.junker@idiv.de)

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