Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv)
Halle-Jena-Leipzig
 

Workshops of the Spatial Interaction Ecology (SIE) group

"Synthesizing invasion ecology across scales and methods"

Organized by:
Dr. Masha van der Sande & Prof. Tiffany Knight

Funded by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research GmbH - UFZ

Date:
4-7 April 2017

Location:
iDiv, Leipzig (Germany)

Description

Biological invasions of ecosystems by non-native species cause ecological and economic problems worldwide. Understanding why certain species become successful in a new range has been a major research focus for the last decades, as this information could guide us in how to eliminate invaders and in identifying possible future invaders. Although many studies have tried to understand the mechanisms (e.g., biotic resistance, environmental filtering) that allow certain plant species to succeed in a new range, studies have shown variable support for different mechanisms. It, therefore, remains difficult to obtain a general understanding of patterns and mechanisms and predict potential future invasions. Possible factors contributing to the differences among studies are differences in vegetation, environmental conditions and spatial scale. Here, we bring together data from 7 studies, each with data on different spatial scales, to evaluate if we can predict plant invasion patterns from functional and phylogenetic indices across studies and spatial scales.

The main questions that we will focus on are:

  1. How does spatial scale (small plots vs. regional scales) influence the role of trait and phylogenetic similarity between exotic and native species on invasion success?
  2. How do different proxies and methods influence these results?

In order to address these questions, we are gathering collaborators and data from a couple of studies. The ideal data to address these hypotheses are:

  • Observational inventory data for small plots with an estimation of species identity and abundances.
  • The presence of trait data for (at least) the 50% most abundant species in the plots.
  • Regional-scale information of species occurrence for native and exotic species (and if possible, with trait information).

Participants

Prof. Tiffany Knight, head of working group Spatial Interaction Ecology (MLU/UFZ/iDiv)
Dr. Masha van der Sande, postdoctoral researcher at Spatial Interaction Ecology (UFZ/iDiv)
Dr. Marta Carboni, Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine, France
Dr. John Dwyer,University of Queensland, Australia
Dr. Laure Gallien, Stellenbosch University, South Africa
Prof. Montserrat
Vilà, Estación Biológica de Doñana (EBD-CSIC), Spain

Also participating remotely:
Prof. Marc Cadotte, University of Toronto, Canada
Dr. Nicolas Gross, French National Institute for Agricultural Research, France
Dr. Oriol Lapiedra, Harvard University, USA
Prof. Serban Proches, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

"Patterns of phylogenetic endemism"

Organized by:
Prof. Tiffany Knight

Funded by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg

Date: 28-31 August 2017

Location: iDiv, Leipzig (Germany)

Description

Trees are an important functional group of organisms, playing an important role in regional and global biogeochemical cycles, supporting terrestrial biodiversity of other taxa, and providing benefits to people, such as timber, fuelwood, and medicine.  Just two months ago, the first list of the world’s trees was published, along with course distribution date (Beech et al. 2017). Holger Kreft, Patrick Weigelt and colleagues maintain a database that has more detailed location data for the world’s vascular plant species (e.g., Kier et al. 2009).

The goal of our workshop is to synthesize the Macroecological patterns of the world’s trees, with the goal of contributing to conservation efforts to set global priorities. Tiffany Knight is an active member in the IUCN SSC for trees. 

Participants

Prof. Tiffany Knight, head of Spatial Interaction ecology (MLU/UFZ/iDiv)
Dr. Dylan Craven, postdoctoral researcher at Spatial Interaction ecology (UFZ/iDiv)
Dr. Masha van der Sande, postdoctoral researcher at Spatial Interaction ecology (UFZ/iDiv)
Prof. Holger Kreft, head of Biodiversity, Macroecology, and Conservation Biogeography (University of Göttingen)
Dr. Gunnar Keppel, Associate Professor and winner of Humboldt Research Fellowship (University of Göttingen / University of South Australia)
Patrick Weigelt, postdoctoral researcher at Biodiversity, Macroecology, and Conservation Biogeography (University of Göttingen)
Dr. Brody Sandel, Assistant Professor in Ecology (Santa Clara University)
Sebastian Leonhardt, student of MSc Biology (MLU)

"Potential plant invaders of the Pacific Islands"

Organized by:
Dr. Dylan Craven & Prof. Tiffany Knight

Funded by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research GmbH - UFZ

Date: 25-27 September 2017

Location: iDiv, Leipzig (Germany)

Description

The focus of this working group will be to establish a watchlist of alien species for island countries in the Pacific Ocean. Using data from a range of sources (e.g., GLoNAF, TRY, PIER, Economic Botany Collection), we will create a list of established aliens across the region with estimates of colonization and propagule pressure. With this data, we would like to employ species distribution modeling to identify locations in which invasive aliens do not occur currently, but could. For each country, this information will allow us to provide a list of species that are likely to have the capacity to naturalize and are likely to be problematic if they do.

Participants

Prof. Tiffany Knight, head of Spatial Interaction ecology (MLU/UFZ/iDiv)
Dr. Dylan Craven, postdoctoral researcher at Spatial Interaction ecology (UFZ/iDiv)
Michael Wohlwend, doctoral researcher at Spatial Interaction ecology (MLU/iDiv)
Dr. Marten Winter, coordinator sDiv (iDiv)
Prof. Dr. Juliano Sarmento Cabral, CCBT (University of Würzburg)
Patrick Weigelt, postdoctoral researcher at Biodiversity, Macroecology, and Conservation Biogeography (University of Göttingen)
Dr. Hanno Seebens, Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre (SBiK-F)
Dr. Damaris Zurell, landscape dynamics (Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL)

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